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July 31, 2006

“The Easiest Linux Guide You’ll Ever Read – an introduction to Linux for Windows users” – a book by Scott Morris

by @ 6:46 am. Filed under freebies, General SUSE, How-To, SUSE Blog News, SUSE Tips & Tricks

It’s finally here!

After several months of writing and revising, I have made available the “Easiest Linux Guide You’ll Ever Read”. It is a 160-page book geared towards people who are competent with using Windows, who have never attempted to use Linux but are interested in giving it a try.

When I was first learning Linux, I got so lost so fast in so many areas, it was hugely overwhelming for me. I was impressed that I was able to download Linux, burn it onto CDs, and get it installed. But once I got that far, I was excited, but my excitement was short-lived. I had no idea what to do next, how to install software, or what software even to install for what I needed. I didn’t understand the concept of Open Source software. I didn’t know where to go for help. I most assuredly did not know a thing about the command line. 10 years of using Windows was of very little help. I felt that though I was a fairly able computer user, I had stepped into a situation where such experience did me little good.

In the book, I try to explain some concepts of how Linux is similar to Windows, helping people become familiar with it very quickly. I also explain some of the most important differences, many of which are improvements from the environment to which they have become accustomed. The book also dispels many myths that may serve to hamper the adoption of Linux more fully. The overall purpose is to give people a bridge from what they already know to the powerful, fascinating world that is the Linux operating system. Because that world can be a little daunting at first, it’s nice to have a little help getting used to things. This is what the “Easiest Linux Guide You’ll Ever Read” is designed to do.

After seeing what Linux has to offer, it is very much worth my time to help other people see it too. At very least take some time and try it out once. You can even dual-boot your machine (covered in the book) to be able to boot into whichever operating system you want. If you dont’ like it, that’s fine. It is an acquired taste for some people. However, it’s hard to tell people why you don’t like something if you’ve never tried it. Try it out and make an informed opinion based off personal experience.

I wrote this book because I really dig Linux and I want to make it easy to try for people who want to. It’s for you, it’s for the community, it’s for anyone who might benefit from it.

How do I help other people try Linux?

A few days ago, I wrote a post about how to share Linux with others. The article is called “SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 for Spreading the Linux Cure“. It got quite an impressive number of comments, most of which were praiseworthy. The article discusses ways that we can spread the word about using Linux to people who have never heard of it or who might be interested in trying it out. Between the “Easiest Linux Guide You’ll Ever Read” and “SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 for Spreading the Linux Cure.” you should have ample tools and resources for helping people learn how to use Linux.

How do I get the book?

If you would like to download the book, it is available from here. It is in PDF format. Just click the link to download, or right-click and “Save Target As…” you’ll be in great shape. Feedback for the book can be left on the feedback form.

This book is released under the Creative Commons License.

63 Responses to ““The Easiest Linux Guide You’ll Ever Read – an introduction to Linux for Windows users” – a book by Scott Morris”

  1. Kenneth Burgener Says:

    Very well written.

    I’m curious, what application did you write this with?

  2. Kenneth Burgener Says:

    Never mind, answered my own question with your book… “This very book which you are reading is a PDF, and was written entirely in OpenOffice.”

  3. Linuxblogger : Linux blog by larrydag Says:

    The Easiest Linux Guide You’ll Ever Read…

    Scott Morris of Suseblog has really out done himself. Apparently he thought it was really worthwhile to burn the midnight oil and come up with The Easiset Linux Guide You’ll Ever Read- an introduction to Linux for Windows users. Scott knows a thing …

  4. JLP’s Blog » Blog Archive » The Easiest Linux Guide You’ll Ever Read Says:

    […] The book will help prevent you from getting lost in the new world of Linux, help with understanding the concept of freedom behind Linux and show you some of the many advantages it has to offer. No more excuses, download the book and try Linux. […]

  5. Tsiolkovsky Says:

    I submitted the ED2k link to eMule Content database, so you can also download and share it over aMule or any other eDonkey2000 compatible client. Here is the page with the link:
    http://content.emule-project.net/view.php?pid=1479

  6. N.Tesla Says:

    Thanks, now I have a really good use for that collection of small thumbdrives. Well done, I wish I had had a copy of this when I made my first foray into linux 2 years ago.

  7. TechNudge Live Linux » The Easiest Linux Guide You’ll Ever Read Says:

    […] Still reluctant to start on Linux? Scott Morris has written a book, “The Easiest Linux Guide You’ll Ever Read- an Introduction to Linux for Windows Users”,  which you can get free for the download (in PDF format) that will help you get a gentle and informed start in Linux including how to dual boot with Windows. Here’s a couple of excerpts from the book to whet your appetite. When you are done with them just go and get the whole thing and read it. What do you have to lose? Free, as they say, is a very good price. The book is available here. Scott Morris began using computers over 20 years ago, at the age of 10. He has used 25 different versions of 5 different operating systems over this time period. Of those many operating systems, he has experience using MS-DOS, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows 2000, Windows XP, and Mac OS 9.x – X. He has enjoyed using many different distributions of Linux, including Mandrake, Red Hat, Gentoo, Fedora Core, Debian, and SUSE. […]

  8. meneame.net Says:

    Guia de Linux para Usuarios de Windows [En Inglés]…

    Interesante libro-manual-guia, donde su autor indica que es perfecta para usuarios de Windows que no han usado linux pero les interesa conocer ese otro mundo. Enlace directo a pdf http://theseoconsultant.com/suseblog_img/easiest_linux_guide_ever.pdf

  9. Rene Says:

    THX Scott for the nice book. I like your work on “spreading the Word” of Linux to the world!!!
    I am new to Linux and using it for one Month now (SUSE 10.1). And I know just this feeling like you discribe it in the preeface of sitting there and not knowing what to do next :-). So I would say that I am a very expirienced Windows user.
    After reading your Intro I felt that this would be the perfekt book for me, It felt like that you just wrote the book just for me :-).
    Please excuse the little criticise following…
    If I am right that this book should be vor experienced Windows users than,
    I realy think that it is not nessesary to explain the installation in such a detail. To be honest the installation is that simpel that an ape could manage it. Only some points are worth an explainaition, partitioning would be such a point, because it is much different to windows. (what is hda where is my C:, D:, :-), which filesystem to take )
    The same goes for the typical programms, If somebody is abel to use Outlook he will manage to use Thunderbird… For the beginning just a suggestion of the most usabale programms would be of great help! Maybe a link to good documentation resources.
    By the way I apriciate the very nice part about getting help and learning more. I would include some links to resources where linux programms are discussed.

    From my experience the most work I have put into in the beginning of getting familliar with linux have been 2 tings
    1. Finding the right tools for my needs. If you switch from windows you will be totaly lost at first. The diversity of linux is a big problem in this matter… Which distribution Gnome or KDE thats all very challenging!
    2. Get the System up and running like you are used from Windows! That includes Networking, 3D Graphiks, Backup, Running Windows progs under Linux (Wine+VMPlayer), ACPI(!!), Rightsmanagement (which was a big mistake to me at first) and a lot of little fancy stuff… one example, is how to create a shortcut! In Gnome this is not working with hold right mouse butten pull and put, like in windows.

    OMG! I Have written to much. As Conclusion, I think your Guide is very suitable for Windows people with little experience in computing. Hope I will find an introduction to linux that fitts my needs. otherwise i schould follow your great example and write it myself… in some years 🙂
    All of you, have a nice one 🙂
    P.S.: Yesterday I have finaly erased my Windows Partition! Kill-Bill 🙂

  10. Free book: The Easiest Linux Guide You�ll Ever Read | Open Source News Says:

    […] The author Scott Morris says: “After several months of writing and revising, I have made available the Easiest Linux Guide You �ll Ever Read. It is a book geared towards people who are competent with using Windows, who have never attempted to use Linux but are interested in giving it a try.”read more | digg story […]

  11. thatkidandy Says:

    I’ve been looking for something like this for a long time. I feel almost the same way you describe; excited for the switch, but totally lost. Looking forward to the read.

  12. Scott Morris Says:

    Thank you for all the great feedback! That really helps me get a feel for what would be the most helpful to everyone. Thanks for taking a few minutes to stop by!

  13. Max Says:

    Great book- took about 1/2 hour to read and really kept people in their Windows comfort zone.

  14. Brian Says:

    I’ve been using computers even longer than the author, but still can’t get comfy on Linux. Shame on me.

    Here’s what I’d like to see covered – installing apps that you download as .tar.gz files. YAST is cool, APT is great. But many apps (especially little developer tools) say just download this thing and install it. I can figure out how to untar the file, that’s easy. But where? On Windows I know that most apps will go under c:\program files\. Some programs I’ll put off the root (Apache and Perl for example). I am comfortable on making those decisions. On Ubuntu, it seems wrong to just install an app in my desktop folder. Where to install? Its almost too easy of a question to answer. I usually just see “wherever you want” but dammit I want to know where the prevailing wisdom would say to put them. Rant over…. now.

  15. Brian Says:

    Oh… forgot to mention… its a great guide, and thank you to the author! 🙂

  16. AlbanyWiFi.com » Blog Archive » The Easiest Linux Guide You’ll Ever Read Says:

    […] http://www.suseblog.com/?p=141 Link to the PDF here. […]

  17. Vince Says:

    Great Book!

    I want to use Linux at work and they use Red Hat there. Could I possibly use Suse to learn on and then have enough know how to go to Red Hat without starting from scratch?

  18. soccerPMN’s Happenings » Awesome Free book: The Easiest Linux Guide You’ll Ever Read, EVER! Says:

    […] The author Scott Morris says: “After several months of writing and revising, I have made available the Easiest Linux Guide You ‘ll Ever Read. It is a book geared towards people who are competent with using Windows, who have never attempted to use Linux but are interested in giving it a try.” Anyone who is reading this that doesn’t use Linux (as I do), get this book!read more | digg story […]

  19. E@zyVG Says:

    Thanks Scott for your hard work. I am quite sure that this publication will be a hit in SUSE community as well as Linux on whole.

    Going to d/l it now and if there are any comments from my side, I will surely let you know. Now I will make a post on my blog to let visitors know that it’s here.

    Tnx.

  20. Al Says:

    Thanks Scott, that’s almost exactly the book I’ve been wanting to read. The biggest problem I’ve got is trying to work out what programs I need to download to do all the things that I take for granted in Windows. A list of the applications that you use (with links to the sites they can be downloaded from) would be a welcome addition to the book.

  21. marco Says:

    Except a few central pages on installation of packages and new programmes, if you really are just a newbie in Linux but quite an expert in Windows this book is useless. Very clear and well-written, ordrely and very easy, it’s all too easy and I as one newbie was disappointed not to learn much in it!

  22. Scott Morris Says:

    marco,
    Sorry ya feel it wasn’t helpful to ya, bro. As you can see, other people found it quite useful. Evidently, you know quite a bit more than the intended target reader. Maybe you just know more than you think you do! 🙂
    Thanks everyone for the feedback. I’ll take a look and see what additions might be appropriate to add.

  23. Freek de Kruijf Says:

    It is a very nice introduction to start using Linux. Still I wonder why you duplicated a lot when describing to install it standalone and next to Windows. A simple “Read on at …” would make the book smaller.
    Also a chapter on the Online Update warning icon could enhance the feeling of the new user that updating for security reasons is build-in.

  24. Torch Says:

    Nice book for newbies, Scott. I’m a ‘sort of’ newbie, and new most of the stuff in there though, so I guess I’m just a bit outside the target audience as well. I’ve used SuSE and Xandros a bit, even installing Xandros on a friends problematic XP laptop. But because of the question that Brian raised above, on August 2, I’ve become discouraged for the time being.

    I plan on taking a Linux course at the local community college next year. Hopefully, it will help to have a Linux expert in the room with me when trying to figure out something tricky.

    Like Brian, I really want to understand the file system, tar.gz files and the command line enough to be able to install (and know exactly where to install) apps that are not packaged as rpms. It’s a show-stopper for me, until I take the class. I’ve read the man pages, and delved into my file system, but I don’t understand enough to decide where things should go. This information is conspicuously missing, everywhere I look.

    If you could add a section to your book with recommendations on installation locations for various types of files and apps, and step-by-step instructions on installing a tar.gz file (including the unzip and the installation commands). To have this all in one place, in simple, non-programmer-ese, would be a great thing.

    Then it would be a book that could take newbies one step further on the road to eliminating Microsoft.

    That’s the road I want to take.
    Thanks.
    Torch

  25. Torch Says:

    Hi Scott,
    I left out a request for an addition to your book. It would be helpful to know how to successfully network a Linux box with a Windows box. I know I’m missing something, but I’ve never been able to successfully access my Windows files (docs and such) from the Linux box. If there are settings that would make this work, I haven’t found them. Step-by-step instructions on creating a small network that includes Windows boxes might be a good addition to the book.
    Thanks.
    Torch

  26. blog.der-link.de Says:

    Linuxbuch zum Download…

    Das Buch “Easiest Linux Guide You’ll Ever Read”(160 Seiten, pdf, EN, CC-Lizenz) von Scott Morris gibt es zum kostenfreiem Download(rechte Maustaste->Ziel speichern unter).

  27. Twenty-Sided ? Blog Archive » Link to someone new Says:

    […] Scott Morris at SUSE Blog has made his book “The Easiest Linux Guide You’ll Ever Read – an introduction to Linux for Windows usersâ€? available for download. It’s aimed at the total newbie. Brilliant. My wife used Linux for a while and it has a lot to offer the tired Windows user, but those first few steps are brutal. Any move in this direction is a good thing in my book. (Although I do hope the book is more pithy than the title!) […]

  28. apt-get install » links for 2006-08-04 Says:

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  29. Linux and Open Source Blog » “The Easiest Linux Guide You’ll Ever Read - an introduction to Linux for Windows usersâ€? Says:

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  34. The Inveterate Observer » Blog Archive » Free book: The Easiest Linux Guide You�ll Ever Read Says:

    […] The author Scott Morris says: “After several months of writing and revising, I have made available the Easiest Linux Guide You �ll Ever Read. It is a book geared towards people who are competent with using Windows, who have never attempted to use Linux but are interested in giving it a try.”read more | digg story […]

  35. linuxmalaya Says:

    nice post for the windows user..

  36. BlogoSquare | Getting to live with linux Says:

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  39. icjones Says:

    This book is awesome! I read through this in one sitting. Excellent work!

  40. Linux Skeptic Says:

    The book has a very good introduction for Linux beginners. However, I have problems with the wireless ip2000 issue :(, it’s my only form of internet connection. I have looked at forums regarding ip2000 and people are talking in linux jargons. Some guy even mentioned that we have to recompile the linux kernel…..I don’t even know what or how to solve it ;(. No I don’t have a geek living near me. If you could make a short step by step guide for windows users, that will be great.

  41. dr.dhawan Says:

    an excellent book for beginers & newbies. The book covers the basics of linux. Infact Scott Morris should publish an advanced version of this book which should contain tips & tricks & guide beginners to an advanced level of linuxing especially on suse 10.1

  42. The Peeler Family Blog » Free book: The Easiest Linux Guide You’ll Ever Read Says:

    […] read more | digg story […]

  43. kalaivani Says:

    i want the linux ebook i heresay that suse is good to read

  44. kalaivani Says:

    an excellent book for beginers & newbies. The book covers the basics of linux. Infact Scott Morris should publish an advanced version of this book which should contain tips & tricks & guide beginners to an advanced level of linuxing especially on suse 10.1

  45. Mo Vestuff Says:

    I have been attempting for over 5yrs to get a usable Linux Box up & running without success…..
    UNTIL UBUNTU linux 6.10. However I still cant do it all………

    For example

    1. Get my Dial-up connection to the web to work? Ubuntu assumes Broadband etc but Australia lags bandwidth due to our thin spread across this big brown land.

    2. What firewall should I use? as I dont want to access the net without one.

    3. What Start-up-monitor software to minimise the programs using resources?

    4. Enable linux to read my existing windows files. I have tried convert all my drives from NTFS to FAT32 so that they should be accessible from linux. But for some reason errors stop the process when Partition Magic 8.0 is converting to FAT32.

    5. Read many of my existing stuff except for .doc. .txt etc.

    THANK YOU SCOTT & all bloggers for help suggestions.
    thx Mo

  46. danny Says:

    Awesome read!!!

  47. sat Says:

    I read the book today eventough downloaded it few days before, and it took about 15-20 mins to get the complete stuff that were in the book.

    But what about partitioning. You mentioned to choose to use the option “shrink windows partition /dev/hda1 to x GB” but if i want it to be installed in last 9.8 GB block of hdd (it’s free as i’ve not allocated to windows)what options will do best. I mean a small 500mb for swap and rest for main suse(ext3)…or firstfew bytes for /boot and rest for suse’s main….someone pls helpme—i want my windows partitions…untouched.(pls tell me something that’ll be best)

  48. sat Says:

    i got it…any was thanaks…book is great and requires less time to get it…

  49. OpenSUSE Linux Rants » Blog Archive » Let’s hear it for STEPHAN, the new OpenSUSE project manager! - suse linux opensuse Says:

    […] As a member of the Open Source Community and as someone who makes a livelihood by working with Linux, namely OpenSUSE, I wanted to take a moment and respond to Andreas’ announcement that you were taking over the project releases. I congratulate you on your willingness to work on such a great Linux distribution, and am thrilled to see things progress and move forward. I didn’t know Andreas very well… I worked at Novell for awhile, and had lunch with him and his wife Jana a couple of times, but I am a super huge OpenSUSE fan, and I want to welcome you into your new responsibilities. I host a website, called SUSE Blog, where I post helpful (hopefully) tips and tricks, how-tos, articles, news, and everything else that comes my way regarding OpenSUSE. I have written a 160-page book (free from http://www.suseblog.com/?p=141) and offer a free course that people can sign up for on my site to learn how to start using OpenSUSE. In other words, I believe in your work, and I am not a very good programmer in languages such as C or C++, but I do everything else I can to contribute to the development and furthering of OpenSUSE. Please let me know if there is anything that I can ever do for you and I will be honored to do so. Have a spectacular day. […]

  50. Dean Says:

    I wished that I’d this was available when I first started. This is wonderful for the new linux enthusiast. Now if you’d write one for sharing files between linux and windows with Samba I’d be in heaven. Thanks for a job well done.

  51. “The Easiest Linux Guide You’ll Ever Read - an introduction to Linux for Windows usersâ€? « alll about linux Says:

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  52. patrick Says:

    HI I have just downloaded the ” Easiest guide ” for SUSE , i was looking for a book about the SUSE as i have orderd the SUSE DVD from Ebay. So this looks lke just what i am looking for.

    I will pass on this link to my friends that are using SUSE at the moment, not sure if they know about this guide ?

    I am looking forward to a good read … hope to print it …
    but 164 pages thats alot of ink

    by patrick

  53. how to use command line in Suse linux Says:

    i don’t be clear for using command linux.
    i want you send the commands and explain the advantage of it.

  54. Ken Task Says:

    Download link doesn’t work! 🙁

    Page not found
    The page you are looking for might have been removed,
    had its name changed, or is temporarily unavailable.
    Please try the following:

    If you typed the page address in the Address bar, make sure that it is spelled correctly.

    – Click the Back button in your browser to try another link.
    – Use a search engine like Google to look for information on the Internet.
    HTTP 404 – File not found

  55. Scott Morris Says:

    Ken,
    Yeah, I had someone recently sabotage some of my files on a server they had let me use. So, I have relocated the book. Go ahead and try again with the new link. Thanks for the heads up.

  56. Carl Says:

    Where is the link? I don’t see a link to the ebook “The Easiest Linux Guide You’ll Ever Read” And can I down load it to my computer?

  57. Adger Linux » Blog Archive » Learning Linux on an Older Less Expensive Computer Says:

    […] “The Easiest Linux Guide You’ll Ever Read – an introduction to … – When I was first learning Linux, I got so lost so fast in so many areas, it was hugely overwhelming for me. I was impressed that I was able to download Linux, burn it onto CDs, and get it installed. But once I got that far, ….. The book has a very good introduction for Linux beginners. However, I have problems with the wireless ip2000 issue :(, it’s my only form of internet connection. I have looked at forums regarding ip2000 and people are talking in linux jargons. … […]

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  60. ha thanh hoa Says:

    can you send to me this book please?

  61. links for 2009-06-02 « ?? Says:

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